capital gains taxes

Capital Gains Taxes Explained

We’ve received calls asking to explain capital gains taxes so we thought this week’s article might be of interest. It tells us, “There are two categories of capital gains: short term (assets held for a year or less) and long term (assets held for longer than one year). The day you acquire the asset isn’t included in your holding period, but the day you sell it is.” “Any net gain resulting from the sale of an asset with a short-term holding period will be added to your gross income and taxed as ordinary income at rates between 10% and 37%.

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tax deadline extended to May 17

What’s the Right Strategy for You?

This week’s article confirms an announcement recently made by the IRS. “You now have an extra month to lower your tax bill with contributions to your individual retirement account (IRA). Just like last year, the IRS has extended the 2020 tax filing deadline to May 17, allowing Americans an extra month to make IRA contributions that can potentially ease their IOU to Uncle Sam while also helping them save for retirement.” Do you need help deciding what is the right strategy for you with your retirement contribution? Call us. We’re always here to help. READ FULL ARTICLE

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retirement accounts

Retirement Accounts

With deadlines for filing tax returns approaching we are beginning to remind people that the deadline for making their permitted annual deposits into their retirement accounts is also approaching. Even if you have a Roth IRA you may want to consider the different options you have to both accumulate wealth for retirement, or if you are already retired and taking income from your savings, to obtain growth potential without being vulnerable to major long-term downturns in the market. Call us, we’re happy to explain some choices you have and discuss how they may fit into whatever stage of retirement planning

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taxes and life insurance

Do Beneficiaries Pay Taxes on Life Insurance?

Lately, we have been asked about taxes and life insurance. Specifically whether or not beneficiaries of a life insurance policy have to pay income taxes on that money, or whether the estate has to pay taxes on it. The simple answer is, usually, no. However, there can be nuances involved. For example, taxes can depend on how the life policy is owned, or how the beneficiary is identified. Because of this, we thought we would share this informative article. Take a look, and then call us if you have any questions. We’re always here to help. P.S. Give the office

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